Home Temples Bull Temple : Basavanagudi – Hindu temple
Bull Temple : Basavanagudi – Hindu temple

Bull Temple : Basavanagudi – Hindu temple
The Bull Temple is located at Basavangudi, atop 'Bugle hill' in Bangalore. Kempe Gowda, who is known as founder of Bangalore, constructed this temple in a typical Dravadian style. The temple has a mammoth monolithic bull called 'Nandi' which is 4.5m high and 6.5m long. It is believed that the statue keeps on growing in size further and further.
A temple built in the Dravidian style by Kempe Gowda, founder of Bangalore, it has a monolithic bull, made of gray granite which is 4.5 mts high and 6.5 mts long. The Nandi bull is revered as the 'vahana' (vehicle) of Lord Shiva. The temple was supposedly built to appease a bull that devoured all the groundnuts/peanuts grown in the area. The bull stopped inflicting damage and the thankful farmers held a Groundnut Fair (Kadalekai Parase) near the temple premises which continues even to this day! The monolithic Nandi bull is . One can also visit one of Kempe Gowda's four towers situated near the temple.
According to a legend, the temple was built in order to appease a vagrant bull that persisted on eating away the entire groundnut grown in the surrounding fields. Ever since the enunciation of Bull temple, the bull never did the same again.

Bull Temple in Bangalore is one of the oldest temples and is dedicated to Nandi, mount of Lord Shiva. The temple is located at Basavangudi and has become a popular attraction amongst the tourists.
The Bull Temple in Bangalore was built to pacify a wild bull that would destroy the groundnut crops of the farmers. The legend has it that bull was hit by a club and got transformed into a stone. But the bull seemed to grow and to stop it grow a trident was placed on its forehead.
Situated in Bangalore - the capital of Karnataka. The sculpture of bull is the holy deity in the temple, also known as "Nandi Temple". The gigantic bull measuring 4.57m in height and 6.10 m in length is carved out of a single rock. It is a sculptural magnum opus.
This Bull Temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva's Vahana (vehicle), Nandi the bull. Large number of devotees visits the enormous monolithic statue of the sitting bull every day.

Non Hindus are not allowed in the temple. There are continuos festive celebrations throughout the year assisted by the musical programs held in the temple premises.
Location:
Located in Bungle hill at the southern end of Bull Temple Rd

About Bull Temple
The Bull Temple situated in Bangalore. One of the oldest temples in Bangalore situated in Basavanagudi and dedicated to Nandi, the mount of lord Shiva. This 4.5 meters tall and six meters long monolithic bull is supposed to be older than the temple housing it. It is believed that the source of the river Vishva Bharti originates at the feet of the statue. The Bull Temple is famous for the myth it carries and an awesome monolithic deity of Nandi, the celestial bull, carved out in the typical Dravidian style of architecture.

The temple was built by Kempe Gowda in the 16th century. The image has been carved out of single granite rock. The original colour of Nandi bull was grey which has now turned black due to the application of coconut oil by the devotees. The statue of the bull has been carved out of a The single rock statue attracts devotees from far and near. Non Hindus are not allowed in the temple. The temple is busy always with some ceremony that is on all the time at the temple premises. On weekends, musicians present their concerts at the temple. The awesome monolithic deity in this temple, Nandi, draws devotees from all over the country.

Timings: Entry to the temple is free and the daily timings are from 6a.m. to 8 p.m.
¤ Legend

The legend has it that the surrounding area of the temple, known as Sunkenahalli was cultivated for groundnut. A bull started grazing in the well-grown groundnut crop, at this, a farmer got furious and hit the bull with a club. Immediately the bull sat down becoming motionless and was transformed into a stone. Poor farmers were left stun and felt guilty. For their repentance they decided to build a temple for the bull, to their surprise the bull was growing in height. The worried farmer then prayed to Lord Shiva who advised them to redeem a trident buried a few feet away from the bull and place the trident on the forehead of the stone statue to stop it from growing. Farmers followed the Lord's advice and the bull stopped growing. Still one can see the trident place on bull's forehead.

Since then farmers offer their first crop of groundnut to the bull. The farmer's hold a Groundnut fair known as Kadalekayi Parishe, near the temple premises every year, to show their thankfulness. It is one of the worth visiting places in Bangalore.
Legends abound regarding the origin of the magnificent bull carved in a crouching position. The surrounding area of the temple was inhabited by groundnut growing farmers and a bull used to graze on the flourishing groundnut crop. Enraged at the loss caused by the bull, a farmer hit the bull with a club which was transformed into a stone. Stunned by this event, the worried farmers built a temple to appease the bull of Lord Shiva, Nandi.

¤ Architecture

The temple is a typical specimen of the Dravidian-style of temple architecture constructed by Kempe Gowda. The temple is nestling in Basavanagudi housing a scared bull of Lord Shiva, it is believed that the source of the river Vishwa Bharathi originates from the feet of the Nandi. There is a Ganesh temple inside the premises with a large deity all made of 110 kilos of butter. The deity of butter is distributed as a prashada (God's food) every four years.

Farmers offer the first groundnuts to the sacred bull. The Bhoganandiswara temple at the foothills of Nandi Hills goes back to the period of the Banas, Cholas, Hoysalas and the Vijayanagar Kings. The image has been carved out of single granite rock. The original color of Nandi bull was gray which has now turned black due to the application of coconut oil by the devotees.
The temple built by Kempe Gowda, a typical example of the Dravidian-style temple, is situated in Basavanagudi. The temple has a huge monolithic bull 4.5m tall and 6m long. It is believed that the source of the river Vishwa Bharathi originates from the feet of the Nandi. The bull has a small iron plate on its head to prevent it, as tradition says, from growing. Also there is a Ganesh temple, with a large deity made of 110 kilos of butter. The deity of butter is broken up and distributed every four years. In Kannada, Basava means bull, which gives the name Basavanagudi to the locality.

Ceremony
In Nov/Dec every year, when the groundnuts have been harvested, Kadalekayi Parishe (The Groundnut fair)is held near the temple. The first groundnuts are offered by the farmers to the sacred bull. Dodda Ganapati, a manificent image of the Lord, is enshrined adjacent to the Bull temple. It is believed that the source of the river Vishva Bharti originates at the feet of the statue.

¤ Festivity

Anually, Kadalekayi Parishe -the Groundnut Fair is held near the temple during the month of November- December when the groundnut crop is harvested. Farmers offer the first groundnuts harvest to the sacred bull. Thousand of visitors and devotees throng the temple site from all over the state.
Thankful farmers still hold annual Groundnut Festival (kadalekayi parishe) near temple premises. Farmers offer their first harvest in the month of November-December to the bull as to show their gratitude. The temple is adjacent to that of 'Lord Ganesha with a unique feature. The idol of the deity is made out of 110 kg of butter after every 4 years. Amazingly the butter never melts. After the end of four years, butter is distributed among devotees.

¤ Accessibility To The Bull Temple

The Karnataka State Road Transport Corporation (KSRTC) bus regularly operates from the all over the state to the Park. Coaches of B.T.S., I.T.D.C., are also available. Tourist coaches and taxis are also available for the park.

Bull Temple Photo Gallery

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